National Disability Insurance Scheme To Start Rolling Out In 100 Days

Victoria is only 100 days out from supporting more people to enter the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) – a new system that will transform the lives of more than 100,000 Victorians with a disability, their carers and their families.

At Kevin Bartlett Reserve in Burnley today, Minister for Housing, Disability and Ageing Martin Foley marked the milestone with members of the disability community. Children of all ages played footy and tennis and had a go at gymnastics, and increased access to the arts was symbolised by a poetry reading.

Disability activist and NDIA board member Rhonda Galbally, one of the designers of the NDIS, spoke about how the scheme will mean that people with a disability can finally plan to live an ordinary life.

The NDIS will roll out gradually across the state from 1 July 2016 and will start with those living in north-east Melbourne: the local government areas of Banyule, Darebin, Nillumbik, Whittlesea and Yarra.

It is a national program that will provide a new way for people with disability to get the help they need to live the life they choose. Under the NDIS, funding will go directly to individuals with disability, who will themselves decide which services or supports to buy, giving them choice and control.

Once it is fully rolled out, the NDIS will mean the end of rationing for support services and the end of waiting lists, and an extra 25,000 Victorians will be receiving services for the first time.

Transition to the full scheme will take place in the next three years with all participants expected to be able to access the NDIS by 2019. Full details of the transition can be found at www.ndis.vic.gov.au

Quotes attributable to Minister for Housing, Disability and Ageing Martin Foley

“The NDIS is about putting people with disability first. They’ve fought hard for this reform and the Andrews Labor Government is proud to be rolling it out in Victoria.”

“At the offices of the NDIS trial site in Barwon, near Geelong, the foyer contains hand prints of messages left by participants in the NDIS. They include, ‘I’ve learned to swim for the first time.’ ‘I’ve got a job.’ And my favourite – ‘Mum can finally go on a date.’ Independence, freedom, happiness – these are the goals.”

“The NDIS also provides certainty to parents, who can be confident their children will receive the care and support they need throughout their lifetime.”

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